Introducing Chicago Author and Journalist, Karen Ford

Clara,

“Thank you for your assistance in helping writers reach an audience and for your willingness to introduce me to your audience. ”  k

Happy Mother’s Day come Sunday to all moms of the world! In response to sentiments from my guest author today, I found the greatest authentic quote on my LinkedIn page:

“You don’t need a reason to help people.”  Zora Neale Hurston.  Come get acquainted with Chicago author and journalist, Karen Ford as she provides insights from her  book, Thoughts of a Fried Chicken Watermelon Woman. Make sure to pick up a copy in support.

Karen Ford

Women of an indiscriminate age are seen as faceless, sexless shapes with almost no value save being wives, mothers, caregivers or comic punch lines. But it’s even worse for Black women. There is no place for us in film or television. (It’s ironic that the only middle-aged Black woman prevalent in film today is actually portrayed by a man.) With the exception of traditional gospel music, we’re not part of the music industry. We’re not broadcast or print reporters or columnists. Other than Maya Angelou, Terry McMillan and Toni Morrison, we’re not widely read. So we remain voiceless.

The other side is that the average Black person in America is voiceless as well. When a subject pertaining to Black people comes up, media people reach out to Dr. Cornell West or Rev. Jesse Jackson or Rev. Al Sharpton. Not to denigrate these gentlemen but they do not speak for me or the millions of Americans like me. We are not a monolithic people and I, for one, take great offense at being treated as such.

When a tornado strikes a small town or when someone shoots up a school, reporters talk to the victims. They speak with the people involved. They don’t call their stock individuals who speak for the White folks involved. Why should it be any different for Black people?

Bio:

Karen Ford is the author of Thoughts of a Fried Chicken Watermelon Woman (Total Recall Press 2014) and the blog, Caviar & Grits (www.caviar&grits.com). Ford serves 3rd Vice President of the National Writers Union, UAW 1981, the only trade union for freelance writers. The union is comprised of over 1400 writers in every genre.As a freelance journalist for over 20 years, Ford has written for a number of local, national and international publications including the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Parent magazine, the Citizen Newspapers, Screen Magazine and Lutheran Woman Today. Her corporate clients have included the University of Illinois, the Chicago Labor Education Project, the Illinois Business Development Authority and the Women in Business Yellow Pages. She has written political ad copy for several local and county candidates and co-authored the book Get That Cutie in Commercials.Karen Ford received her BA with a focus in political science and her MS in public service management from DePaul University. She has a certificate in union organizing from the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and a certificate in teaching community college from the Encore Organization of Harold Washington College. Ford is married with four children and loves to read, dance, cook and travel in her spare time. She lives with her husband in Chicago.

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Thoughts of A Fried Chicken Watermelon Woman  is Available on Alibris.com, Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com and BooksAMillion.com.

Author Contact info:
Karen Ford
773-509-5058

 

 

 

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6 thoughts on “Introducing Chicago Author and Journalist, Karen Ford”

  1. Thanks for introducing us this intriguing writer. Karen, I hear ya! Looks like Thoughs of Fried Chicken Watermelon Woman will be a great read.

    Like

  2. Karen is a very deep woman and a very thought-provoking author. She always lets you know what she’s thinking because she is not afraid to speak her mind. Great interview Clara!

    Like

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